Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Rescheduled: Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission meeting for November rescheduled

Richmond City Council – Richmond City Hall - 900 E. Broad Street, Suite 305 - Richmond, VA  23219 - www.council.richmondva.gov
                                                            
COUNCIL PUBLIC INFORMATION NEWS ADVISORY
IMMEDIATE RELEASE TO BE FORWARDED AND SHARED
Wednesday, 31 October 2012

Rescheduled: Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission meeting for November rescheduled

New date: Thursday, November 8, 2012

WHAT              (Richmond, Virginia U.S.A.) -- The Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission meeting that was canceled for tomorrow has been rescheduled and will now be held Thursday, November 8, 2012. This meeting is free and open to the public and all Richmond residents are invited and encouraged to attend.

                              The Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission typically holds monthly meetings regarding its work and ongoing projects in helping to preserve and present the history of slavery in Richmond. The upcoming meeting dates are listed below and are typically scheduled to be held the first Thursday of each month, beginning at 4:00 p.m., at the same location. These meetings are free and open to the public and all Richmond residents are invited and encouraged to attend. The agenda for these meeting typically include the following:

·Welcome
·New Business
·Updates
·Committee Reports
·Charette
·Upcoming Events
·Closing Remarks/Adjournment

WHEN              Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission
                        2012 Upcoming Meetings
                                   
                                    CANCELED: Thursday, November 1, 2012; 4:00-5:30 p.m.

                                    RESCHEDULED to be held: Thursday, November 8, 2012; 4:00-5:30 p.m.
                                    Thursday, December 6, 2012; 4:00-5:30 p.m.
                                   
WHERE             Richmond East District Initiative Government Services Building
                        701 N. 25th Street (In Richmond’s Historic East End)

WHO              The Honorable Delores L. McQuinn, Chairman, Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission; Delegate, Virginia House of Delegates - 70th District
                        
CONTACT        For more information regarding the Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission, please contact The Honorable Delores L. McQuinn, Chairman, Richmond Slave Trail Commission (Member, Virginia House of Delegates -70th Voter District) at 804.698.1070, or deldmcquinn@house.virginia.gov
                        or
                        Steve Skinner, Council Public Information Manager, Richmond City Council Office of the Council Chief of Staff, at 804.646.6052 (o); or, steven.skinner@richmondgov.com (email); or visit the Richmond City Council website, at www.council.richmondva.gov

Background ____________________________________________________________________________

Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission
One of Richmond City Council's more than 55 official boards, task forces and commissions that it has created and that assists with providing oversight of certain projects and priorities, the Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission is a government entity of Richmond City Council that was established by Resolution Number 98-R 102-107, adopted July 13, 1998, as amended by Resolution No. 2000-R111-109, adopted July 24, 2000, as amended by Resolution No. 2003-R132-123, adopted July 14, 2003, as amended by Resolution No. 2003-R155-141, adopted September 8, 2003, as amended by Resolution No. 2004-R125-131, adopted June 28, 2004.

     The purpose of the Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission is to assist Council with oversight and assistance in helping to preserve and present the history of slavery in Richmond. The Commission meets monthly and includes 17 members that are appointed by Council to serve for three year terms. The composition of membership is as follows:

The Commission shall be composed of seventeen (17) members.  Such persons shall be appointed by the Council and shall serve for terms of three (3) years.  The membership of the Commission shall include at least one (1) member of City Council, not less than three (3) members of the “Hope in the Cities” organization and a representative from the Department of Parks, Recreation and Community Facilities.  Any appointed Council members shall be given the first option of serving as the Chair of the Commission in order of their appointment. Five members of the Commission shall constitute a quorum for meetings.

Over the years, Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission has worked on a number of important projects, which have included:

·      2011
Unveiling of 17 Richmond Slave Trail Markers located throughout the Shockoe Bottom area of Richmond, marking sites that help tell the historic journey, human impact, and the role Richmond played in the tragic history of slavery.

The Richmond Slave Trail Markers will serve to recognize the regrettable time in our nation’s history when parts of the United States allowed the enslavement of fellow human beings and an estimated 8 percent of U.S. families owned slaves just before the U.S. Civil War. The site of the event and location of one of the 17 markers, Lumpkin's Slave Jail was the largest slave-holding facility in operation in Richmond, Virginia from 1840 until the end of the U.S. Civil War in 1865. During that time, Richmond was home to the largest domestic slave export business in the United States. The Confederate Army surrendered Richmond, the Capital of the Confederacy, on April 3, 1865.

Following shortly after the end of the U. S. Civil War, which ended in Virginia on April 9, 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States of America Constitution was adopted on December 6, 1865. This amendment officially abolished slavery. A precursor for this amendment was the Emancipation Proclamation, an Executive Order signed by President Abraham Lincoln, on January 1, 1863, which proclaimed the freedom of slaves living in states under Confederate control.

·      2009
Development of the conceptual Richmond National Slavery Museum
Richmond City Council provides annual staff assistance and financial support for the Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission. Council staff support includes providing fiscal management, public information, writing, publication creation, graphic design, special event and project management, promotions and fundraising. Additional staff support is provided by the Richmond City Administration through the Richmond Department of Economic Development, which includes project engineering and management.

·      2009
Development of the Richmond Slave Trail Marker Program, Signage and
Commemorative Site: Lumpkin’s Slave Jail

·      2008
Discovery of Lumpkin’s Slave Jail historic foundation and architectural
artifacts.

·      2008 – 2009
Phase II Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Archaeological Assessment: which
included engineering and storm water engineering

·      2007
Richmond International Unveiling of Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue on Friday, March 30, 2007, erected at 15th and E. Main Streets. Included design and construction of the Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statute plaza and erection of the statue. This project was part of a global initiative placing three statues in three countries. Dedicated to slavery reconciliation, the installation of the statue represents nearly 10 years of work between the City of Richmond, Virginia, USA (North America), Liverpool, England (Europe), and the Republic of Benin (Africa). A statue was erected in Liverpool in 1989 and the Republic of Benin in August 2005.

·      2006
Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Archaeological Assessment
Lumpkin's Slave Jail was the largest slave holding facility in operation in Richmond, Virginia from 1840 until the end of the U.S. Civil War in 1865. During that time, Richmond was home to the largest domestic slave export business in the United States. Owned by Robert Lumpkin, the jail was a place that tens of thousands of African men, women and children were "stored" before being transported to slave owners living in states where slavery was legal. Following Lumpkin's death shortly after the Civil war, his common law widowed wife Mary Lumpkin, who was African-American, inherited the estate. In 1867, she leased the jail to Reverend Nathaniel Colver, who established a school for freed slaves at the site. Founded by the American Baptist Home Missionary Society and the National Theological Institute, the school grew into what is now Virginia Union University.

·      2003
Acquisition of Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue. For three quarters of the 18th Century, Virginia (North America), Liverpool, England (Europe), and the Republic of Benin (Africa) represented one of the largest global commercial trade triangles of enslaved Africans. Liverpool's shipbuilding industry provided the vessels that sailed to the Kingdom of Dahomey, now the Republic of Benin, where Africans were loaded on ships and transported to the Americas, with Richmond, Virginia being one of the major recipients.

Support
Richmond City Council provides annual staff assistance as available and financial support for the Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission. Council staff support includes providing fiscal management, public information, writing, publication creation, graphic design, special event and project management. Additional staff support is provided by the Richmond City Administration through the Richmond Department of Economic Development, which includes project engineering and management.
Council financial support is provided through appropriations in the Richmond City Budget. This includes appropriations in the Richmond City Budget Capital Improvement Plan, Non-Departmental budgets and Departmental budgets. Funding is predicated on requests made by the Commission and as determined by Council.

Examples of Richmond City Council Slave Trail Commission financial investment support, per Fiscal Year (FY), include:

  FY 2011- $6,000
For general Commission support

  FY 2010- $6,000
For general Commission support

  FY 2009 - $75,000
For general Commission support ($30,000 - spent $5,124) and for development of the Richmond Slave Trail Marker Program; signage and commemorative site; Lumpkin’s Slave Jail; development of conceptual National Slavery Museum; and, paid sponsorship for Symposium at the University of Richmond for the Civil War Sesquicentennial.

  FY 2008 - $370,000
For general Commission support ($30,000 - spent $7,748) and for Phase II of Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Archaeological Assessment, which included $155,000 for earthmoving and $35,000 for engineering and stormwater engineering (floodplain and proximity to I-95 berm) and $150,000 for archaeological services to hire a vendor.

  FY 2007 - $511,000
For general Commission support ($11,000) and design and construction of the Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statute plaza; erection of the statue; and, the International Unveiling of the Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue

  FY 2006 - $35,000
For Richmond Slave Trail Brochure Creation/Printing Phase I of Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Archaeological Assessment

  FY 2003 - $119,000
For acquisition (purchase) of Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue and freight
from the United Kingdom

     Additional financial, staff and archeological support has also been provided by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, Alliance to Conserve Old Richmond Neighborhoods, and a number of corporate, nonprofit and individual financial sponsors.


- end -


______________________________________
Steven R. Skinner, APR
Council Public Information Manager
RICHMOND CITY COUNCIL
OFFICE OF THE COUNCIL CHIEF OF STAFF
Richmond City Hall
900 E. Broad Street, Suite 305
Richmond, Virginia  23219
804.646.6052 (office)
804.335.4054 (mobile)
804.937.1386 (home/mobile)
804.646.5468 (fax)
____________________________________________

MISSION The mission of Richmond City Council
is to represent citizens in creating and amending
local laws, providing government policy and
oversight, and approving the city budget.

VISION Richmond City Council is committed to
creating a vibrant community that is a great place



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